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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and that means that we still have a big hole to fill. gwen: who is in that big hole? and why is it that month after month, and after month, it never seems to get more shallow? >> let's go back a little ways. a few months ago, the economy seemed to be having a nice head of steam. we were seeing very strong job growth numbers of 200,000 per month. and suddenly everything seemed to hit a wall. we've had a run of bad luck. we had very bad snowstorms earlier this year, a series of natural disasters here. the big hit came from gasoline prices that shot up to around $4 for gasoline because of the libyan rebellion. and finally the japanese earthquake and tsunami turned out to be a much bigger negative for us than we may have appreciated. because it cut off the flow of vital parts. put all those things together and it cost a lot of momentum. may very poor job numbers and in june, very poor job numbers. it was kind of surprising because in fact over the last few weeks, we had a wave of optimism because some of those tempering negatives seemed to be going away. as gasoline prices dropped and japan got b
in congress still saying that a first-ever default on our nation's financial obligations would be no big deal? gwen: wall street, bond-rating agencies and the federal reserve sound the alarm. >> it would create a very severe financial shock that would have effects not on on the u.s. economy but on the global economy. gwen: while some republicans say it's a phony problem. >> this is misnomer that i believe the president and the secretary have been trying to pass off on the american people. gwen: who's right? who's wrong? where are the honest brokers? and what happens next? covering the week, gloria borger of cnn, john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news, michael duffy of "time" magazine, and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis. live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week with gwen ifill," produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. >> to give our war fighters every advantage. >> to deliver technologies that anticipate the future today. >> t
, it actually has these built in very significant disincentives towards making big deals, towards working together. and we are now seeing the fruits of that evolution in the house in particular. let's talk about the house in particular. john boehner has been a very interesting figure in all of this. at one point he was walking in the back door of the white house and trying to cut a deal with the president. obviously, shamed out of that. so now he came up with his own deal and spent a lot of time last night bringing people in through his front door, recalcitrant republicans, to get them on board. is he wounded by what happened this week? is he strengthened? >> i think what happened this week is that we have seen how little leverage and how weak john boehner really is. you know, he has a leadership style that he has said, you know, after the top-down leadership style we saw with nancy pelosi, that he wanted to be a consensus leader, that things would come from the bottom up and he won his majority in the house because a lot of these freshmen ran specifically against the establishment and ag
be a big deal if the u.s. government couldn't pay its debts but i don't think that's where we're going to end up. we're not greece. greece is a small economy, greece is way, way deeper in hot than we are. people have lots of options where to put money and greece is low on their list because they think there's going to be a default. where the greece metaphor comes in is that greece and portugal and spain and ireland have raised questions about whether governments keep their promises. and to the extent that the congress and the president can agree on a long run fiscal plan, it raises the question of, are we ever going to get our act together so that we don't become greece? >> and is the market yet or do you suspect it will either price this in or panic? >> it's been amazing how calm the markets have been and i think there are two reasons for that. one is, they kind of assume that eventually washington will do what it has to do. and secondly, greece and europe have been such a preoccupation that nobody wants to have money there, so they've moved money to the u.s. as europe has done its ev
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)